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Vijay Mehta
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xx Dr. Priya Ramnath
« Thread started on: Jan 3rd, 2008, 08:12am »

Here is the unfortunate story as I have been able to piece it to gather from the news reports.
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Priya Ramnath - Healer accused to be a killer!


Priya Ramnath 39 year old Anesthesiologist, mother of two children (ages 5 & 12) was arrested at Woodland Heights Medical Center, Lufkin in the morning of Nov 30, 2007. Apparently the patient who was to undergo surgery was already sedated and US Marshalls arrested her.

Back in July 1998 Dr. Ramnath was a junior resident in England and a patient 51 year old Patricia Leighton had undergone surgery for infected bunion and went in a septic shock and was transferred to Intensive Care Unit. It is alleged that Dr. Ramnath injected 3 cc of Adrenaline to resuscitate the patient which resulted in her death.

Dr. Ramnath moved to USA in 1999 to join her husband Seshadrinathan Ramnath who was already a US Citizen. Since she has received training at University of South Florida and worked in Tampa and McAllen and now in Lufkin, TX.

4/26/2007 Extradition treaty between US and England became effective - this was signed earlier in 2003.

9/18/2007 extradition was requested.

11/30/2007 she was arrested and has been denied bail twice citing flight risk.

I do not know anyone involved in the case but it caught my attention because I am familiar with many mistakes that physicians have made and some of them resulted in death of the patient also. If we were to make all these cases involuntary manslaughter the only thing a physician in such a situation will be forced to do is to cover up.

Notice how British headlines are already calling her Dr. Death.

‘Death’ doctor arrested before op – BBC News
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/7151196.stm


Attorney request doctor be released on bond – Lufkin news
http://www.lufkindailynews.com/hp/content/news/stories/2007/12/29/doc_detention.html


« Last Edit: Jan 16th, 2009, 09:32am by Vijay Mehta » User IP Logged

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xx Medical Error or Manslaughter?
« Reply #1 on: Jan 3rd, 2008, 08:13am »

http://www.lufkindailynews.com/opin/content/news/opinion/stories/2008/01/6/letter_mehta.html

Criminalization of medical errors is a dangerous path. Here is Dr. Ramnath in 1998, as a junior resident, is alleged to have given a higher dose of a life saving drug (adrenaline) to the patient in crisis. Of course she could have consulted senior physicians but that is not what goes thru your mind as you see a patient collapsing in front of you. As we say in medical practice, hind sight is 20/20.

I am curious as to how she was able to get such a large dose (six times the suggested amount) anyways? All dangerous medication should only be available in the safe level of dose. And when a physician asks for much higher dose then the nurse should be able to deny that also in any good ICU.

While in training the medical errors are also responsibility of teaching physician also. That is why they are in training.

Alleged is a key word here. How do we know that she in fact gave the higher dose? Medical practice is a difficult job and physicians make critical choices for the patient all the time. With all the thoughtful and considered actions there are few who prove to be wrong and injurious to the patient.

If we make all these errors as involuntary manslaughter we can fill our already overpopulated jails with physicians.

Dr. Ramnath has not even had a chance to present her side of the story and she is being treated as hard core criminal. Here is a professional with two children who is willing to put up a bail, give up her passport and abide by the condition of house arrest and judge denies her the bail?

I think there may be a valid medial negligence case but England is making criminal charges which are excessive. Also by making it a criminal issue they are bypassing statute of limitation. I think she is entitled to defend herself against the extradition but not allowing her the bail might intimidate her into submission.

Why did the US Marshall have to take her away in the morning after the patient was sedated? Why she was not arrested at the end of the day? Did they even consider possible psychological pain caused to the patient who was already sedated for planned surgery?

I urge the judge to realize that medical errors may be infrequent but in spite of our best effort they do happen. And when they do, imprisoning a physician for extended period of time will not serve anyone but the institution needs to look it as a sentinel event and figure out a way to prevent in future.

Please let Dr Ramnath give her side of the story without intimidating her by keeping her in jail at the taxpayer’s expense. She is no criminal for God's sake she is mother of 2 and a lady who has dedicated her life to helping others.

By criminalizing the mistakes more of them are likely to go underground and the patients may never benefit in future from the lessons learned.
« Last Edit: Jan 8th, 2008, 1:45pm by Vijay Mehta » User IP Logged

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xx Medical Official Support Dr. Ramnath
« Reply #2 on: Jan 3rd, 2008, 08:24am »

http://www.lufkindailynews.com/hp/content/news/stories/2007/12/17/doctor.html

Medical officials offer support for anesthesiologist

By ANDY ADAMS
The Lufkin Daily News

Monday, December 17, 2007

Two Lufkin medical officials indicated Friday that they would welcome a Lufkin anesthesiologist back to work if she is not extradited to England to face charges related to the death of a patient nine years ago.

Priya Ramnath was jailed Nov. 30 and remains in custody. Her attorney has asked a federal judge to set her bail at a hearing expected to take place Tuesday in federal court in Lufkin.

Dr. J.S. Chandra, a heart physician who has worked in Lufkin for 23 years, called Ramnath "one of the best trained anesthesiologists we've ever had in Lufkin." He said she was trained at the Cleveland Clinic, which he called "probably the No. 1 or No. 2 hospital" in the United States. Ramnath has done quite a bit of cardiac work in the six months he has worked with her, Chandra said.

"She has assisted a lot of heart patients, and the outcomes have been excellent," he said. "I have no problems with her professional abilities at all. She has a lot of confidence in a specialized field. She is a very competent physician."

Lance Jones, CEO of Woodland Heights Medical Center, said that, if Ramnath is released on bail, his hospital will reconsider her privileges at his hospital, which were suspended when she was arrested. He said she still has an active Texas license and that the state's Board of Medical Examiners is one of the strictest licensing authorities in the country.

"Depending on the outcome of Tuesday's case, her status will be immediately reviewed at the hospital," Jones said.

Ramnath is accused of killing patient Patricia Leighton, 51, of Burntwood, England, on July 22, 1998, after allegedly administering a lethal dose of adrenaline.

In 2003, the British government filed an involuntary manslaughter charge against Ramnath — five years after Leighton's death.

Ramnath's attorney, Al Charanza of Lufkin, has said his client did not know about the charge until she was arrested.

Staff writer Jessica Savage contributed to this story.
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xx Why should Dr. Priya Ramnath be released on bail
« Reply #3 on: Jan 3rd, 2008, 08:44am »

http://www.lufkindailynews.com/hp/content/news/stories/2007/12/16/doctor.html

Attorney cites special factors in requesting bail for doctor
Legal counsel says he plans to fight extradition of client

By JESSICA SAVAGE
The Lufkin Daily News

Sunday, December 16, 2007

The attorney of a Lufkin doctor being held in custody for the death of a patient in England nine years ago has re-filed a motion asking a federal judge to set bail at a hearing expected Tuesday.

In an amended motion filed Friday, Lufkin attorney Al Charanza stated Dr. Priya Ramnath, an anesthesiologist jailed Nov. 30, should be given bail because the British government's alleged delay of its investigation and Ramnath's extradition in 2003. Charanza has said he will fight the extradition process.

Ramnath is accused of killing patient Patricia Leighton, 51, of Burntwood, England July 22, 1998, after allegedly administering a lethal dose of adrenaline.

In 2003, the British government filed an involuntary manslaughter charge against Ramanth — five years after Leighton's death. By that time, Ramnath had been living in the United States for about four years where she completed her residency and was practicing medicine at a Florida hospital. In 2004, the British government issued a statement, apologizing to Leighton's family after it missed an important deadline, virtually eliminating chances of extraditing her to England.

An extradition treaty signed in 2003 by the United States and United Kingdom did not take effect until April 26, 2007, Charanza stated in his amended motion. The British Embassy in Washington, D.C. did not request the extradition of Ramnath until Sept. 18.

The U.S. Marshals Service arrested Ramnath Nov. 30 at Woodland Heights Medical Center in Lufkin where she had been practicing for six months.

At a status hearing Dec. 4 in Lufkin, U.S. Magistrate Judge Earl S. Hines said Ramnath will likely remain in custody until an extradition hearing.

"This is the type of procedure that almost certainly will result in Dr. Ramnath remaining in custody until she is extradited" Hines said. "And there's not a person in this room that is happy about that."

Hines said for him to consider Ramnath's bail at a detention hearing Tuesday, Charanza would have to prove a "special circumstance" for her release.

Charanza stated in an amended detention motion filed Friday that Ramanth is likely to "succeed" at an upcoming extradition hearing "since the United Kingdom has failed to establish probable cause with reliable evidence." He is asking a federal judge to set bail under those special circumstances. A detention hearing is expected to be held 9 a.m. Tuesday in Lufkin.

A complaint filed by the U.S. Attorney's Office Nov. 29, and made public Dec. 6, stated Ramnath left England days after Leighton's death. Charanza said Ramnath did not flee the country, but decided to move to the United States then to be with her husband, who is a U.S. citizen.

Leighton had undergone surgery the day before she died for an infected bunion, stated the complaint. The next morning Leighton's health declined. She was diagnosed with septic shock and then transferred to the intensive care unit at Stafford General Hospital where she was placed under the care of a team of doctors, including Ramnath, the report stated. There Ramnath allegedly gave Leighton a three-milliliter dose of adrenaline after other doctors had advised against it, the report stated.

"Mrs. Leighton reacted immediately by becoming agitated, sitting upright and shouting. She fell back onto the bed and became unresponsive and stopped breathing with cardiac arrest ensuing. Attempts to resuscitate her were unsuccessful," the report stated.

The director of the hospital's ICU spoke with Ramnath about the incident. Ramnath told the director "in hindsight she had been wrong to proceed in the manner which she had" and that she should have called the consultant anesthesiologist for the hospital, the report stated.

The hospital completed its investigation in 2001 and turned it over to authorities. The British government filed a charge in 2003.

Charanza said Ramnath knew nothing about the charge until she was arrested.

In an interview with the Tampa Tribune in 2004, Ramnath told a reporter who asked her to comment on the charge that she knew nothing about an investigation into Leighton's death.

"I don't know anything about this," she told the Tribune in an article published Sept. 2, 2004. "This is the first time I'm hearing about this."

Ramnath has two children, ages 12 and 5. She completed her residency at the University of South Florida and has worked in hospitals in Tampa and McAllen, Texas, prior to moving to Lufkin. Her Texas medical license was approved in 2004. Woodland Heights Medical Center and Memorial Health System of East Texas have both suspended her privileges, pending the outcome of the case.


« Last Edit: Jan 3rd, 2008, 08:47am by Vijay Mehta » User IP Logged

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xx Dr. Ramnath Released on Bail
« Reply #4 on: Jan 12th, 2008, 1:41pm »

Lufkin Doctor Out On Bail

by Tashun Chism

Lufkin doctor Priya Ramnath was arrested in late November on an involuntary manslaughter charge related to the death of a patient in the United Kingdom. After several weeks of hearings where Ramnath and her lawyer asked a judge to allow her to post bail, the judge ruled in her favor Friday. There were plenty of happy family members and friends there to celebrate.

"I felt that we had done a very good job documenting the clear and convincing evidence that she is not a flight risk, that this case has problems in the United Kingdom and those problems in the United Kingdom are a special circumstance of why she should be released," Ramnath's attorney, Al Charanza, said.

The judge agreed, even though bail is very rarely granted in most extradition cases. Ramanth's good work record in the U.S., and her strong family and community ties also influenced his decision. Ramnath's attorney says there's one thing in particular that made the judge rule in her favor.

"The judge granted bail in this case because he found a special circumstance and he believes based on the evidence we've been able to present him so far, she has a very likely chance of succeeding in the United Kingdom," Charanza said.

But Ramnath's release doesn't come without special conditions.

"She will be under house arrest so she won't be able to leave her home, and we've already surrendered the passports for herself and her immediate family," Charanza told KTRE.

Ramnath's extradition hearing is set for February 15th at the federal courthouse in Lufkin.
We thank the judge for using commonsense and letting Dr. Ramnath be with her family pending extradition hearing. We wish Dr Ramnath well in her fight against extradition. - Vijay Mehta
« Last Edit: Jan 12th, 2008, 1:42pm by Vijay Mehta » User IP Logged

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xx Re: Dr. Priya Ramnath
« Reply #5 on: Jan 27th, 2008, 2:12pm »

American judge backs British doctor fighting extradition over death of patient 9 years ago
Last updated at 20:52pm on 27.01.08

A doctor faces extradition from America to Britain, accused of killing a female patient being treated for an infected bunion nine years ago.

But a judge in Texas has taken the unusual step of granting bail to anaesthetist Dr Priya Ramnath, 39, saying a British jury was bound to clear her.

Indian-born Dr Ramnath is alleged to have injected Mrs Patricia Leighton with adrenaline, against the advice of more senior medical staff, when she went into septic shock at Staffordshire General Hospital, Stafford, in July 1998.

Mrs Leighton, of Burntwood, suffered a heart attack and died. Dr Ramnath moved to America just days later and has worked there as an anaesthetist ever since.

In 2003, an extradition case failed because the Crown Prosecution Service just missed a five-year deadline. Now, new laws make extradition possible again – and mother-of-two Dr Ramnath has been charged with involuntary manslaughter.

But on January 11, Judge Earl S. Hines granted her bail in Lufkin, Texas, where she was arrested in December at the hospital where she works. The extradition hearing is set for February 15.

In the bail document, Judge Hines said: "All the evidence points to the conclusion that Dr Ramnath's actions were taken with the intention of saving a life, not taking one. A jury might or might not conclude that Dr Ramnath made a very serious mistake based on a very serious error in judgment.

"However, such evidence is nowhere near enough for a crime as serious as the United Kingdom's version of involuntary manslaughter to be committed."

He authorised bail under house arrest because Dr Ramnath was not a "flight risk" and a jury would not find her guilty. He said there was no reason to keep her "confined with the customary contingent of crackheads, crazies and miscreants", adding:

Dr Priya Ramnath was arrested at an American hospital

"Every rational concern augurs for her release. Her husband and children need their wife and mother. Critically ill patients could benefit were she available."

In 2004, a coroner ruled that Mrs Leighton, 51, had been unlawfully killed. Now the Texas judge's comments have angered Mrs Leighton's family, who have vowed to keep fighting for justice.

Her daughter Debbie, 38, who lives at the family home with her father Brian and sister Nikki, said: 'The death was very difficult for us in 1998 and it's still difficult now. The anaesthetist was lucky she can go back to her family because my mum can't.

"Our mum has missed so much in all our lives. Dad has since retired, something they dreamed of doing together and they had planned how their days would be. We'll fight this case for ever."

Dr Ramnath's lawyer Ben Rose said: 'She treated an apparently dying patient at 3am.

"She did everything she could to save the patient's life. Ten years later, the CPS accuses her of manslaughter.

As a result, she spent Christmas and New Year in custody.

"Having carefully reviewed the evidence, a senior US federal judge has expressed grave concerns regarding the case and granted bail. In spite of all of this, the CPS refuses to justify their inexplicable decision to continue with this case."

A CPS spokeswoman said: "We would not seek extradition if we didn't feel we had sufficient evidence."


Thank God for some common sense. Dr. Ramnath was faced with a critical patient and she did what she thought was the best in patient's interest. I am not sure what they are trying to achieve by charging her for manslaughter except for intimidation. I agree with the judge no impartial jury or judge will convict her.
Good luck to Dr Ramnath.

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xx Case is not what they have made out to be
« Reply #6 on: Feb 2nd, 2008, 3:33pm »

I know a lot about this case and I find it very annoying that people are being mis-led by the press and commenting on a case study they know nothing about. The said adreneline was given by Doctor Ramnath against the advice of all other colleagues, it was NOT given to rescusitate at all, it was given in the wrong circumstances and top pofessionals, doctors and nurses have stated this. There was no operation, the problems were due to low blood pressure readings. Doctor Ramnath left Britain following a meeting with hospital officials a couple of days afterwards, after stating that she was wrong to do what she did. Her husband was not a US citizen at this time, he only became one in 2005 and she is still not one. The hospital led its own investigations and called in Police in 2001. As the case is a first of its kind, the Police had to investigate fully prior to speaking with Doctor Ramnath. In 2004 the charge was brought following the inquest verdict of unlawful killing. However following extradition rules the Police were unable to bring her back to Britain. Doctor Ramnath has known about this case all along, not just in 2004 upon speaking to American newspapers and definitey not in 2007 upon her arrest. When people are wishing Doctor Ramnath well, lets remember that a 51 year old woman died, leaving behind a husband and 2 children...People are commenting on press speculation not facts, i.e., if the Judge believes she is so innocent, why was she kept in Custody over Christmas and New Year, eventually given bail of $300,000, put under house arrest and family's passports surrendered?

Thank you for sharing with us.

My biggest concern is that I believe the whole exercise is meant to intimidate Dr Ramnath rather than seek justice. Medical practice requires critical choices. Many a times people do not agree on what is the right choice. Now if we start accusing physicians and nurses of involuntary manslaughter every time there is an adverse outcome, it would have terrible effect on the morale of hardworking well meaning physicians and nurses.

All errors like that should be considered as professional negligence to be evaluated by professional standard board. There is a huge difference between professional negligence and involuntary manslaughter.

You are right a 51 year old woman is dead. But that does not mean Dr Ramnath killed her. Whatever condition caused her blood pressure to drop could have lead to her death. When a physician admits that he or she should have not done certain things does not mean they are guilty of manslaughter.

How do they plan to prove anything after these many years is beyond me. They can succeed in ruining Dr Ramnath financially.

Remember, it is one thing to accuse someone of involuntary manslaughter and totally different thing to prove it beyond reasonable doubts in a court of law.

I hope British authority reconsider it again.

If you have specific information please feel free to post it here.

I agree with you Dr. Ramnath had known about the case every single moment of the day since it happened back in 1998.

- Vijay Mehta

« Last Edit: Feb 4th, 2008, 05:10am by Vijay Mehta » User IP Logged

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xx Dr. Priya Ramnath
« Reply #7 on: Feb 4th, 2008, 3:23pm »

Hi, I do not understand what you mean by "intimidation rather than justice"...and I don't believe that the UK Police Force or Crown Prosecution Service would be still attempting to seek extradition after all this time if they did not feel that the case was strong enough...I hope justice prevails...


1. If every time a patient dies in UK if they charge the physician for involuntary manslaughter there would be lot more physicians serving the life sentences.
2. Why did they took so much time after the incidence to charge her?
3. UK Police may be charging her for political reasons to make it look like they are doing something. They have already bungled the case by filing late.
4. Charges in criminal case have to be proven beyond doubg to all the jurors not just a majority. This makes it very hard after all these years to prove anything.

I hope justice prevails too. - Vijay Mehta
« Last Edit: Feb 5th, 2008, 4:52pm by Vijay Mehta » User IP Logged

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xx Dr. Priya Ramnath waives extradition fight
« Reply #8 on: Feb 16th, 2008, 7:55pm »



http://www.ktre.com/Global/story.asp?S=7880535&nav=2FH5

by Tashun Chism

Today Priya Ramnath did something she'd never done before. She walked out of the federal court in Lufkin without having to wear shackles or an orange jump suit.

"I'm pleased to have Judge Hines allow her to stay out one more week," said Ramnath's US attorney, Al Charanza.

One more week before United Kingdom authorities come to Lufkin to extradite Ramnath. She and her attorney had originally planned to fight extradition. But to the court's surprise, Ramnath decided to waive today's extradition hearing.

"She's hoping by agreeing to go back and working with the United Kingdom's judicial system that the family will have closure and she can get this closure for her as well so she can return to her family here in the United States," Chazanza told us.

An extradition treaty has been made between the the US, the UK and Ramnath and her attorneys. For voluntarily turning herself in, Ramnath expects bail to be set at her next hearing in the UK. Charanza tells us Ramnath's bail here in the US gave her much needed to time to be with friends and family, not to mention plan her next steps.

"It's given her an opportunity to work with me and her attorneys in the United Kingdom to address this case and decide what the best course of action is. And we believe our best course of action is going back to the United Kingdom and adressing it there in the courts of the united kingdom," said Charanza.

Ramnath is scheduled to turn herself in for extradition Friday, February 15, 2008. If UK authorities decide to come before the set extradition date, Ramnath must turn herself in one hour prior to their arrival.
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xx Smiling up beat Dr. Ramnath arrives
« Reply #9 on: May 16th, 2008, 4:41pm »

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http://www.expressandstar.com/2008/05/15/doctor-in-dock-over-routine-op-death/
Smiling and dressed in a bright suit, anaesthetist Dr Priya Ramnath arrives at court to face a charge of manslaughter.

Ramnath, aged 39, is facing a charge of manslaughter following the death of 51-year-old Patricia Leighton, of Dewsbury Drive, Burntwood in 1998.

Mrs Leighton was at Stafford Hospital to undergo a routine procedure to have an infected bunion removed. It is alleged Ramnath injected Mrs Leighton with a lethal dose of adrenalin � against the advice of more senior medical staff at the hospital.

Mrs Leighton suffered a heart attack and died.

Ramnath appeared at Wolverhampton Crown Court yesterday, where the case was adjourned until later in the year. She was not invited to enter a plea.

The hearing, in front of Mr Justice Goldring, lasted around an hour while administrative and legal matters were dealt with.

The 39-year-old doctor, a mother- of-two, was further remanded on conditional bail by The Honourable Mr Justice Goldring. The next hearing is scheduled for a date in October.

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xx October Hearing - when exactly?
« Reply #10 on: Oct 10th, 2008, 7:13pm »

Hi is there any update on Dr Priya Ramnath in UK courts? Her case was supposed to be in October.
Thanks


No news yet on her hearing. This may mean her hearing may be in later part of October or later. We are monitoring the situation and will post any new news. - Vijay Mehta
« Last Edit: Oct 11th, 2008, 08:40am by Vijay Mehta » User IP Logged

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xx Re: Dr. Priya Ramnath
« Reply #11 on: Oct 17th, 2008, 12:53pm »

i appreciate what Dr. Mehta is doing. Dr.ramnath 's intention was to save pt's life, there can not be any dobt about it. It is unfortunate that a person died , but
if pt was in septic shock nobody can prove beyond doubt that she died of adrenaline and not because of septic shock. I feel sorry for pt's family but i do believe she was misguided by hospital officials. The way dr. ramnath was treated initially when arrested it was embarrasing for all practicing physicians in usa or any where in world. It is not fair. she should not have been treated like any criminal. where is american medical aasosiation or texas medical assosiation? we pray for her and we believe justice will prevail and she will be free soon. and will join her family who has been suffering since it all started. No jury or judge in his or her right mind can possibly convict her. thank you.



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xx Tiral for Dr Priya Ramnath begins
« Reply #12 on: Jan 14th, 2009, 11:14am »

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1114606/Doctor-killed-bunion-patient-fatal-dose-adrenaline-court-hears.html

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Trial begins for Dr. Priya Ramnath. It is turning into "he said - she said" trial.

Prosecutors are going to say that Dr. Ramnath injected the adrenaline prior to cardiac arrest therefore not indicated while the defense will content that pt had a cardiac arrest, therefore the adrenaline was indicated.

Prosecutors are claiming that Dr. Ramnath ignored the advise of her colleagues and did not seek the guidance of the consultant. However in case of emergency if a physician feels that patient needs life saving drug in moments are they expected to have a conference all to decide the merits of treatment?

This case may have a far reaching impact on physicians caught in emergency situation. You are darned if you do and darned if you don't.

I hope the judge and the jury will use their common sense and throw away this case. It is time support the physicians who have to confront the difficult choices day in and day out.

Our prayers are with Dr. Ramnath and the family.

- Vijay Meha
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xx Priya Ramnath trial 1/5/2009
« Reply #13 on: Jan 15th, 2009, 09:48am »

http://www.birminghampost.net/news/west-midlands-news/2009/01/15/burntwood-woman-died-after-doctor-ignored-hospital-staff-warnings-court-told-65233-22696004/

Burntwood woman died after doctor ignored hospital staff warnings, court told

Jan 15 2009 by Ross McCarthy, Birmingham Post

A doctor treating a woman for rheumatoid arthritis had no reason to believe she might suddenly die when she was sent to a Staffordshire hospital.

Dr Thomas Shearan said when he learnt of Patricia Leighton’s death he realised something “catastrophic” had happened.

It is alleged the 51-year-old’s death was caused after a doctor gave her a large injection of adrenaline after having ignored the warnings of other doctors and medical staff.

Dr Priya Ramnath, aged 40, has denied the manslaughter by gross negligence of Mrs Leighton from Burntwood, Staffordshire.

Dr Shearan told Birmingham Crown Court that there were problems treating Mrs Leighton’s condition and that in April 1998 she was enrolled in a controlled drug trial.

He said as a result she said she felt better but on July 20 she reported to be in a lot of pain and suffering from a wound on a bunion.

There was concern about her low blood count, he said, and it was arranged for her to be taken to the hospital the following morning to have the bunion cleaned out.

Asked about her condition, Dr Shearan said: “She was in quite a lot of pain, despite being on opiates. Otherwise she was not bad.”

Mr Michael Burrows QC, prosecuting, asked the doctor: “Did you have any cause to suppose she was so seriously ill she might die?”

The doctor said he did not and that Mrs Leighton was conscious, knew where she was and what her condition was.

Dr Shearan said when he learnt about her death two days later his immediate concern was the ten other patients who were on the drug trial.

Mr Burrows said after Mrs Leighton was taken to Stafford District General Hospital, Dr Ramnath administered the adrenaline despite the fact that two doctors present told her not to do it and without referring to the consultant in charge.

He said the doctor later resigned from her post at the hospital before moving to the United States.

The case continues.


Mrs Leighton was suffering from Rheumatoid arthritis she was not responding to usual medication so she was enrolled in an experimental drug trial. On July 20, 1998 she reported to be in a lot of pain from a wound on a bunion. There was a concern about low blood count (?wbc). She was in septic shock she had reaction to antibiotics given to her. Could the experimental drug be responsible for her death? Could she have died of septic shock that failed to respond to the treatment?

How are they going to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that it was adrenaline that killed the patient? Colleagues of Dr. Ramnath recommended her to ask the attending but it is a judgment call of a physician in case of emergency. At the most Dr. Ramnath may be faulted for making a wrong judgment call but no a manslaughter.
- Vijay Mehta
« Last Edit: Jan 15th, 2009, 09:51am by Vijay Mehta » User IP Logged

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xx Re: Dr. Priya Ramnath
« Reply #14 on: Jan 20th, 2009, 3:55pm »

my mother gave evidence against Dr Ramnath on Monday (18th January 2009).

whilst it was exceptionally stressfull for all concerned, it was clear that her evidence, like the other doctors who were witnesses and have been called to give evidence, was that Dr Ramnath gave the injection against their judgment. the patient was not in crisis as she had blood pressure - she was alert, sitting upright and talking.

the evidence of 4/5 doctors is suggestive that dr ramnath disregarded, "arrogantly", their advice. this was despite one of the doctors physically putting his hand over dr ramnath's and telling her not to give the injection.

dr ramnath's evidence conflicts with 4/5 independant witnesses who put the patient's death at her door.

it is unclear at the moment whether she herself will give evidence, or what forensic evidence will state.

what is clear is that, come conviction or aqcuittal, there are no winners in this case. nothing can bring mrs leighton back. and if dr ramnath escapes conviction, the family's 10 year quest for justice is in vain.

now the outcome is in the hands of the jury....
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